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How To Get Baby To Sleep In Crib After Co Sleeping

By Amy A. Vincent | Fact checked by Dr. Leah Alexander, MD, FAAP | Updated on April 24, 2022

Co-sleeping with your baby is a great way to create a strong bond and help them feel secure. However, there will come a time when you will want your baby to sleep in their own crib. This can be a difficult transition for some babies, but we can make the transition process easy and smooth with the right tips and tricks! In this blog post, we will discuss how to get the baby to sleep in a crib after co-sleeping. We will go over some tips that have worked for us, and we hope they work for you too!

How To Get Baby To Sleep In Crib After Co Sleeping

How to get baby to sleep in crib after co sleeping?

“It’s not fair to the child if you suddenly say to him/her that from now on, you’ll be sleeping in your own crib or room when the baby has been co-sleeping for a few years,” says Alanna McGinn, a sleep consultant in Burlington, Ont. “You should always begin with communication at this age.”

When the baby realizes it, you can do the following tips and tricks to make the transition process easier.

Gradually open up the space between you and your child:

One way to start getting babies used to sleeping in their crib is by gradually increasing the space between you and your child. This can be done over some time until they are eventually sleeping in their own crib.

Start by using a bedside co-sleeper or a bassinet beside your bed. These items will keep your baby at a safe distance, ensuring he doesn’t wake up one day and find himself suddenly and unexpectedly without you, which might be frightening. A bedside sleeper is a great way to ease into the transition while also providing you with some additional space.

Place the crib in your bedroom:

If you don’t have a bassinet or don’t want to spend money on one just for the crib transition, you can bring your child’s crib into your room for a short time. You can place it next to your bed and put the baby in the crib. The little one will find himself beside the mom and feel secure.

However, the baby is present in the same room while not sharing a bed. When your baby learns to sleep in the crib in your bedroom, it’s time to move on to the next step.

Stay into your child’s room for a few days:

 If your child is having a difficult time sleeping in their crib, and you don’t have the option to move the crib into your room, you can move into their room temporarily and stay there for a few days.

This technique allows you to stay close to the baby while maintaining a distance. It will also help them get used to the new environment and allow you to keep an eye on them.

It’s important to remember that this should not be a lengthy stay. The objective is to spend some time with your baby and then flee the area when she becomes comfortable with her new surroundings.

Also read: How long do babies stay in mini crib

Establish a regular bedtime routine:

While transitioning the baby to sleep in a crib after cosleeping, you can set a sleep routine that is extremely helpful. A consistent bedtime routine will help your baby get into the habit of going to sleep at roughly the same time each night and sleeping through the night.

It can make it easier for your baby to adjust and become accustomed to their new environment without feeling stressed out and may help them take longer naps during the day. It can also be useful at other transitional sleep stages, such as sleep training.

Introduce your children to their surroundings:

A critical factor in helping your child feel comfortable sleeping in their crib is to familiarize them with it. If the baby has never been exposed to their bed, or it’s too new for them, they might have trouble at this stage.

You can spend more time in the nursery with your child when he is awake. You may do all of the activities in the nursery, including diaper changes, post-bath time, relaxation, and play. Spending more time in the nursery will help your child get to know his surroundings. As a result, the room will not be frightening for the child when it’s time for sleep at night.

Start with nap times:

Nap times are much more easily controlled than nighttime sleep. It may be a helpful bridge for co-sleeping to crib migration. You can put your child down in the crib during daytime naps. This will give your child a sense of familiarity with their new surroundings before actively transitioning them into their own room.

There is no doubt that it is a massive change for both of you when you move the baby to the crib after co-sleeping. It’s difficult, stressful, and tears-filled. So, you’ll need a lot of patience for this.

Our Amy Baby Review experts have reviewed some great cribs for tall babies. You may read it for further information.

 What age should you stop co-sleeping?

The American Academy of Pediatrics advises that a child younger than four months old should not sleep in the same bed as their parents. However, they recommend that babies should sleep in the same room with their parents for at least six months to a year in a crib or a bassinet rather than in their parent’s bed.

It is known as ‘room sharing’, which is not the same as sleeping together in bed. Research shows that it decreases the risk of SIDS.

What age did the baby sleep in a crib in their own room?

What age did the baby sleep in a crib in their own room
Courtesy – Canva Pro

It may be difficult for children to move from the parent’s bed to a crib in their own room. However, the best time is between 9 and 12 months. It’s because children go through some amazing developmental changes at this age, and they become more self-reliant and communicative.

However, if the child does not get used to his new abilities, he will most likely be more fussy and clingy both during daytime and overnight sleep.

Also read: When should you buy a crib during pregnancy

What Are The Expert Advice Say About Co-Sleeping?

According to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), co-sleeping must be clearly defined. Bed sharing and room sharing both indicate co-sleeping, but experts recommend room sharing.

In other words, they do not suggest co-sleeping. According to studies, room sharing reduces the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) by up to 50 percent.

“What we do recommend is having newborn children sleep in your bedroom. Place bassinets close to the bedside, especially for nursing infants and the ease of the mother,” says Dr. Robert Hamilton, health professional.

Why do parents co-sleep with their baby or toddler?

Some parents co-sleep with their baby or toddler because they think it makes their baby feel safe and secure. They enjoy the close physical contact with their baby, think that it is satisfying and rewarding, and also feel that it is beneficial to develop relationships with their children.

Along with it, some parents prefer co-sleeping with their baby because they find it more practical. They are less stressed out if the baby cries out due to hunger or when it’s time to change a diaper. They think it is simpler to breastfeed or change the nappy if the baby is co-sleeping.

Wrapping up:

Thanks for reading the complete guide on how to get baby to sleep in crib after co-sleeping. We hope you’ve found this guide helpful and informative. To sum up, we just want to mention again that if you’ve been co-sleeping with your baby in bed, it may be time to transition them into their own crib.

But don’t make a hurry or force them to sleep in the crib. Don’t simply leave them in their room for the first few weeks. Bring the crib into your bedroom and set them beside your bed. When they’re used to it, slowly move them into their room.

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